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Dairy herd improvement by the use of reproductive biotechnologies

Many milking cows cannot conceive due to heat stress caused by global warming. This results in low milk production. In fact,  the pregnancy rate  of milking cows after artificial insemination is around 30% during summer in Taiwan. Countries in the Asia Pacific region are confronted with the same milk production challenges caused by global warming (heat stress). This has negative impact on milk production of milking cows in the human food chain. Improvement of milking cows under heat stress is an urgent task for relevant institutes supporting small-scale farmers. Recently genomics, ovum pick-up (OPU) from live cows, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer (ET), as a combination of technologies has been proven helpful in taking cows to the “next level” of genetic improvement.

The 10-day intensive training course in the Philippines exposed the trainees, most of whom are veterinarians, to the discipline and technologies of genomics, ovum pick-up (OPU) from live cows, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer (ET). This combination of technologies has been proven helpful in taking cows to the “next level” of genetic improvement. The training approach was a combination of lectures, which provided the theoretical basis for the topics presented, and laboratory exercises and field work where the trainees got to experience actual OPU, ET, IVF, etc. The trainees also had the chance to report and share with the group the status of livestock reproduction and use of advanced technologies in their respective countries.

Major findings and recommendations:

  • All the trainees learned the cutting-edge reproductive technologies such as OPU and IVF and field based practical technology of ET because they understood their importance;
  • Produce a step-by-step handout or guidelines on the processes taught in laboratory or field exercises;
  • Provide more time for field work especially in the area of ET;
  • Develop training modules on areas like morphological studies of oocytes, and other practical subjects or themes;
  • Include other areas like caesarian operations and artificial insemination in future training courses;
  • Consider developing an advanced follow-up course to monitor the progress of the trainees; and
  • Form an e-group or a network base in order to continue the sharing of experiences and learnings on reproductive biotechnologies;

Dairy herd improvement by the use of reproductive biotechnologies

Held in Munoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines, 13-22 July, 2015
No. of participating countries: 10 (Cambodia, Ecuador, Indonesia, Pakistan, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam)
No. of papers presented: 14
No. of participants: 7 lecturers from Japan, Thailand, Vietnam and Philippines 
Co-organizers: Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCAARRD) Philippine Carabao Center (PCC)

List of papers

Keynote

1.    The role of reproductive biotechnology in addressing food sufficiency and climate change
    -    Libertado Cruz
2.    State-of-the-art of reproductive biotechnology in buffaloes
    -    Rangsun Parnpai
3.    Top reproductive performance of dairy cattle in tropical climate with assisted technology
    -    Ming-Che Wu
4.    The economic value of assisted reproduction biotechnology to ruminant industry
    -    Bui Xuan Nguyen

Resource papers

5.    Status of livestock reproduction and application of advanced biotechnologies in Vietnam
    - Nguyen Thi Hiep
6.    Current situation of livestock reproduction and application of advanced reproductive  biotechnologies in Thailand
    -    Virapol Jamsawat
7.    Ruminant production and application of assisted reproductive technology in Malaysia
    -    Mark W. H. Hiew
8.    Current status of reproductive biotechnologies in livestock breeding in Indonesia
    -    Muhammad Yusuf
9.    Current status of livestock reproduction  and the use of advanced reproductive biotechnologies in Lao PDR
    -    Khampasong Ninnasopha
10.    Current status of livestock reproduction and the use of advanced reproductive biotechnologies in Ecuador
    -    Maria Elena Romero
11.    Status of livestock reproduction and application of advanced reproductive biotechnologies in the Philippines 
    -    Cyril Baltazar
12.    Current status of livestock reproduction and the use of advanced reproductive biotechnologies in Cambodia
    -    Menghak Phem
13.    Status of livestock reproduction and application of advanced reproductive biotechnologies in Pakistan
    -    Amjad Riaz
14.    Dairy cattle reproductive technology application in Taiwan
    -    Feng-Hsiang Chu    

For further information, contact Dr. Takashi Nagai, FFTC Deputy Director

FFTC Deputy Director Dr. Takashi Nagai delivers his welcome remarks at the opening ceremony of the training program. In his remarks, the Japanese animal scientist emphasized the role of reproductive biotechnologies to mitigate the effects of global warming.

The trainees from 10 countries in their lab gowns, together with their lecturers pose for posterity. The training program is a joint project of FFTC, PCAARRD and PCC.

(L to R) Mr. Feng-Hsiang Chu, of Livestock Research Institute, Taiwan, Mr. Khampasong Ninnasopha, National University of Lao, Lao PDR, and Dr. Muhammad Yusuf, Hasanuddin University, Indonesia are just three of the 17 trainees from 12 countries who took turns in performing laboratory exercises related to biotech reproductive technologies.

Dr. Satoko Matoba (left) from the NARO Institute of Grassland Science in Japan, is one of the speakers and resource persons who patiently taught the international trainees how to perform embryo transfer in buffaloes. In this photo, Dr. Matoba is seen explaining something to Dr. Amjad Riaz, the University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan.

Filipino trainee, Dr. Abraham Tandang of the University of the Philippine at Los Baños, injects a tranquilizer to the buffalo.

Mr. Oudom Bondith, a trainee from Cambodia, prepares his specimens and samples in the PCC laboratory. The trainees experienced hands-on exercises in actual in vitro fertilization, embryo transfer and ovum pick up from live cows.


 


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